Chinglish

My dear friend Linda sparked an idea in me, blog related of course. She is a German friend who keeps her own blog, albeit it’s written in German. http://linda-china.blogspot.com/

I have many pictures of Chinglish signs I have seen throughout my time in Xi’an and China. I feel they are worth noting. Enjoy!

January 2011: At the Forbidden City in Beijing. Is it iced coffee or is it coffee? The world may never know! 

 

January 2011: At the Bird’s Nest in Beijing. Note the missing “i.” I also like the elevator…perhaps you can engage in inappropriate behavior while riding it. 

 

Please tell me what are hot wheels? No one looks hot or sexy while riding a segway. 

 

January 2011, The Great Wall at Badaling: I have to give them props here, because at least this sign is translated in a fashion that is comprehensible, but the grammar is atrocious. 

 

January 2011, Badaling: Thankfully, I am learning Chinese because this sign in Chinese actually means “bathroom/restroom.” No native English speaker would be able to decipher this poorly translated sign. They would be SOL if they had to use the facilities. 

 

Sign reads, “To be noticed, The ticket of the Great Wall please, Buy the ticket of the Great Wall.”

 

Da Yanta: “There is clearance in bamboo steamer; entry is dangerous.”

 

March 2011, Da Yanta: “Warm Reminded: Plants have feelings, Take good care of it makes sense.” I am still working on a witty remark to add here. 

 

May 2011, Xi’an EXPO: Oh, don’t worry, after reading this sign, I will never again play with water. 

 

May 2011, Xiao Yanta: “Please not to trample, Small grass too contain life.”

 

June 2011, Hua Shan: The top sign reads “Steap moutin by the right way.” Ok, I am definitely better off reading the Chinese although I can only recognize the characters and can’t actually derive a meaning.

 

This is an oldie, from my trip in 2007 to the Great Wall at Simitai. The sign reads, “Appreciate the lovely view of the Great Wall, Do not forget the fire is heartless!” Ahh, this one is a real gem, a quintessential Chinglish phrase in action. It’s as if Confucius or Laozi (Lao Tzu) has returned to teach us a philosophical life lesson. 

3 thoughts on “Chinglish

      • wodezitie says:

        会,可是只能说很简单的中文。在美国我没有找到很多机会用上中文,所以这么多年以后,我的中文退步了很多。如果你在中国住了兩三年而还在那儿教书,我想你的中文大概说得比我好多了!

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